New entry in the Digiplay Games Research Bibliography:

Miller, Kiri (2007)
Ethnomusicology

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New entry in the Digiplay Games Research Bibliography:

Nis Bojin (2008)
ELUDAMOS Journal for Computer Game Culture

Image of booksRecent theorizing around games and notions of play has drawn from a pool of mid-20th century scholars including such notables as Johann Huizinga, Gregory Bateson, Roger Caillois and Ludwig Wittgenstein. Through his articulation of the concept of language as a type of game, Wittgenstein has been both adopted and critiqued for purposes of circumscribing what are now commonly held as the necessary constituents of games including their systemic nature and the acquiescence of their participants to an agreed-upon rule structure: a set of rules which Wittgenstein likens to the ‘grammar’ of language (Salen and Zimmerman, 2001;Suits, 1978; Juul, 2005; Wittgenstein, 1953; Finch, 2001; Brenner, 1999). Although thus far Wittgenstein has served as a pillar of 20th and 21st century game theory canon, this paper adopts Wittgenstein’s notion of language-games not for purposes of examining games, but for purposes of examining the design of games. The pursuit of this paper is to utilize Wittgenstein’s lens of the language-game to investigate what it is that informs and consequently shapes and reinforces game design epistemologies in an attempt to encourage a reflexivity about the design practices behind the games we create. Read more...

New entry in the Digiplay Games Research Bibliography:

Jahn-Sudmann, Andreas (2008)
Eludamos. Journal for Computer Game Culture

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New entry in the Digiplay Games Research Bibliography:

Jahn-Sudmann, Andreas ; Stockmann, Ralf (2008)

Image of booksIn the course of their increasing sociocultural importance, the academic interest in computer games has been growing considerably in the last years. This profound anthology comprehensibly introduces latest approaches in the central fields of game studies and provides an extensive survey of the contemporary game culture. Internationally renowned media and literature scholars, social scientists, game designers, and artists explore the cultural potential of computer games and present new concepts of researching sociocultural, industrial, and aesthetic aspects of digital entertainment. Read more...

Jason Rutter & Jo Bryce
Cyberspace Research Unit, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, PR1 2HE

Draft Prepublication Paper
Rutter, J. & Bryce, J. 2008. “The Consumption of Counterfeit Goods: ‘Here be Pirates?’”, Sociology, 42(6), pp. 1146–1164.

Abstract

Social science, policy and popular discourse around counterfeiting regularly position consumers of counterfeit goods as part of a technological elite or motivated by anti-capitalist or anti-corporate positions. In order to explore this construction and highlight its associated limitations, this paper presents quantitative data collected through postal and web-based questionnaires looking at the frequency, location and motivations for the purchase of counterfeit leisure items for consumers in the United Kingdom.

New entry in the Digiplay Games Research Bibliography:

Lammes, Sybille (2006)
Mediaterr@:Gaming Realities. A Challenge for Digital Culture

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New entry in the Digiplay Games Research Bibliography:

Swalwell, Melanie; Wilson, Jason (2008)

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New entry in the Digiplay Games Research Bibliography:

Barton, Matt (2008)

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New entry in the Digiplay Games Research Bibliography:

Whalen, Zach (2007)
Music, Sound and Multimedia

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New entry in the Digiplay Games Research Bibliography:

Stephen P. Yang, John. T. Foley (2008)
Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport

Image of bookshe USDHHS recommends that children accumulate at least 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) each day. Regular physical activity is believed to be an important component for reducing the levels of obesity. One way to increase physical activity levels that is gaining popularity is interactive video games (exergames). This is evidenced by its use in school districts throughout the US and also in middle schools throughout the state of West Virginia. Two of the more popular exergames are Dance Dance Revolution (DDR) by Konami, Inc. and EyeToy Play by Sony, Inc. DDR is a dance simulation game which requires the player to step (lower-body) on a motion sensing dance pad; whereas, EyeToy is a game that requires the use of the arms (upper-body) to play the games. At this time, there is little evidence to suggest one game is more effective than the other for accumulating MVPA. The purpose of this study was to investigate the differences in time spent in MVPA while playing DDR and EyeToy. Design: Participants in this study were 12 children (ages 9-18) from a local YMCA that were invited to play both DDR and EyeToy while wearing a heart rate monitor. Seven of the children were girls; five were boys. Each child was permitted to play each game on different days for up to 45 minutes. Results: An analysis of gender difference of each game revealed no significant difference (p = .455); therefore, the data was collapsed. Overall, participants spent more time in MVPA while playing DDR when compared to EyeToy, 80.84% to 53.45% respectively. This difference was found to be significant (p =.039) using a Wilcoxon Signed Ranks Test. For this study, it appears that playing DDR was more effective than EyeToy for accumulating MVPA. It is important to note that both exergames were played at MVPA for at least half of the time (≥ 20 mins), and all participants played the entire 45 minutes except one. These findings suggest that these two exergames could be healthy alternatives to other physical activities for accumulating the recommended 60 minutes of MVPA. Read more...

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